Community First Bank for loans, mortgages, savings and investments in Fairview Heights, Swansea, Belleville, O'Fallon, Shiloh and the Metro-East area
Personal landing Business landing Other Services landing
Other Services landing
Security

Contact Us
Community First Bank

4600 North Illinois Street • Fairview Heights, IL 62208
Corner of Route 159 & Frank Scott Parkway
Phone (618) 234-9500          Fax (618) 234-9585
HUD.gov
Location/Hours   Service Fees   Policies & Disclosures   Security   Community Links   About Us   Calculators   Site Map
Emergency numbers. To report:
Lost/Stolen Credit Card call (800)558-3424
Lost/Stolen ATM/Debit Card call (800)528-2273
Community First Bank provides banking services for Fairview Heights, Swansea, Belleville, O'Fallon, Shiloh and the Metro-East St. Louis area. Personal services include checking, CDs, savings & investments and loans. Business services include checking, CDs, loans and other business services. We also offer online banking. Other services include the CFB Debit/ATM Card, safe deposit boxes, telephone banking and credit card services. See our rates for interest bearing accounts.

Community First Bank will NEVER ask you to verify your account information online, nor will we request this information through email.

Beware email and Internet-related fraudulent schemes being perpetrated with mounting frequency, intensity and creativity. They typically involve the use of seemingly legitimate email messages and web sites to deceive consumers into disclosing sensitive information, such as bank account information, with the ultimate goal of gaining access to financial accounts or committing identity theft and other illegal acts.

Community First Bank will not ask you to supply any account information or personal information by phone or email.  Any official requests for sensitive information will be written on bank letterhead.  If you are in doubt regarding the validity of a request for information, please feel free to contact the bank directly for confirmation.  If you think you are a victim of identity theft or if you are solicited for information, please contact the bank immediately at (618) 234-9500.
Community First Bank will NEVER ask you to verify your account information online, nor will we request this information through email. Community First Bank will not ask you to supply any account information or personal information by phone or email. Any official requests for sensitive information will be written on bank letterhead. If you are in doubt regarding the validity of a request for information, please feel free to contact the bank directly for confirmation. If you think you are a victim of identity theft or if you are solicited for information, please contact the bank immediately at (618) 234-9500.
Alerts

2014/05 - More Ways to Save at the Bank

2013/12 - Phishing Alert Notification

2013/11 - (Update) OUCH! How to Shop Online Securely

2013/11 - OUCH! How to Shop Online Securely

2013/05 - Tips on Banking in a High-Tech World

2013/05 - IRS: Beware of e-Mail Scams about Electronic Federal Tax Payments

2013/05 - IRS: We Do Not Initiate Contact by Email

2013/03 - Email Claiming to Be From FDIC

2013/02 - National Credit Fraud Alert

Reviewed 2013 - Counterfeit Cashier's Checks

2012/10 - NetTeller Phishing Alert!

2011/02 - Avoiding Mortgage Modification Scams and Foreclosure Rescue Scams (requires Adobe Reader)

2010/12 - ATM Card Skimming and PIN Capturing Awareness Guide (requires Adobe Reader)

2014/05 - More Ways to Save at the Bank

From FDIC Press Release about the Spring 2014 issue of FDIC Consumer News (requires Adobe Reader):

Consumers want to make the most of their dollars for priorities ranging from everyday expenses to a comfortable retirement, but knowing how to do that can be a challenge. That's why the latest issue of FDIC Consumer News features questions to ask plus money-saving tips and strategies to consider when it comes to banking and borrowing. The Spring 2014 edition also includes a variety of simple suggestions for safe shopping, buying and ways to pay. Here's an overview of what is in this issue:

More ways to save at the bank: Finding money to put into savings can seem difficult, but there are some strategies that can make it easier. FDIC Consumer News features five basic questions to ask, plus strategies and resources that can help individuals reach their savings goals.

For consumers interested in finding a free or low-cost checking account, the newsletter provides questions that may help sort through the various options. One suggestion is that individuals start by deciding what they need most from a checking account.

Mortgages can be expensive, but there are ways to save. For prospective homeowners, the newsletter discusses comparison shopping, trying to negotiate the interest rate as well as the fees, and finding ways to save on some third-party settlement services, such as title insurance. Current homeowners can save in ways such as refinancing into a new mortgage or potentially saving thousands of dollars in interest by sending in a little extra each month to pay down their mortgage faster.

The newsletter also discusses how refinancing a personal loan — including an auto loan, credit card and student loan — sometimes may save a borrower some money but also can involve pitfalls.

Tips for safe shopping, buying and ways to pay:The FDIC newsletter provides an overview of simple ways to protect against fraud and theft when shopping in person or online. And, with ongoing media attention to data breaches, in which customers' credit or debit card information was stolen by cyber thieves who hacked into a business's computer systems, the FDIC newsletter is reminding readers about previous tips for protecting themselves and adding some new ones.

The publication also discusses online person-to-person ("P2P") payments, which an increasing number of consumers are turning to using their computer or smartphone, as an alternative to paying with cash or writing a check. P2P payments can be convenient, but there are potential costs and risks in areas such as the privacy of personal information.

2013/12 - Phishing Alert Notification

A few of our customers have contacted Community First Bank expressing concerns about text messages they received, stating their debit cards are blocked or temporarily deactivated and to call an attached phone number. These are Phishing Texts - false messages sent to gain access to your account information. Do not reply to these texts - delete them.

When you receive a valid text message from Community First Bank regarding your account

  • The text message will arrive with a 5 digit code and contain the name of our debit card processor, dollar amount of the transaction and merchant name.
  • You will be asked to reply with 'Yes’ if you authorized the transaction. You will receive a confirming text message and can continue to use your card with confidence.
  • A ‘No' reply means you have not authorized the transaction. You will receive a confirming text message and you will be contacted immediately by a fraud specialist to protect your account. Please answer this important call.
  • Do not reply to the text message with any personal or confidential card information.
  • If you would like to opt out of receiving these important messages by text, you may reply with 'STOP' to indicate this preference.

If you have any questions or concerns please contact Community First Bank at 618-234-9500.

2013/11 - (Update) OUCH! How to Shop Online Securely

Tis the Season to be Cautious - Many people will choose to shop online this holiday season unfortunately becoming vulnerable to unscrupulous websites. The November 2013 issue of the Monthly Security Awareness Newsletter looks at the dangers of shopping online and provides help on how to shop safely (requires Adobe Reader for full-screen or Adobe Reader for mobile).

2013/11 - OUCH! How to Shop Online Securely

Tis the Season to be Cautious - Many people will choose to shop online this holiday season unfortunately becoming vulnerable to unscrupulous websites. The November 2013 issue of the Monthly Security Awareness Newsletter looks at the dangers of shopping online and provides help on how to shop safely (requires Adobe Reader for full-screen or Adobe Reader for mobile).

2013/05 - Tips on Banking in a High-Tech World

New technology can dramatically change the way that people manage and save money. To help consumers learn more about banking in a high-tech world, the Spring 2013 issue of FDIC Consumer News features practical tips on how to reap the benefits and avoid potential problems. Other timely topics include dealing with debt collectors, finding affordable small loans, thinking about your options after a branch closing or a bank merger, and taking precautions before buying a bank certificate of deposit (CD) from a deposit broker instead of directly from a financial institution. Other topics and tips are covered in the latest newsletter:

Banking in a high-tech world: The lead article notes that sophisticated
criminals try to steal valuable details from credit and debit cards that can be used to create a counterfeit card or make purchases online or over the phone. The FDIC newsletter offers tips for preventing or detecting card fraud and stresses the importance of quickly reporting a problem. The newsletter also looks at how new bank technology can help consumers, such as with "mobile banking" (using a smartphone, "tablet" computer or other device) and electronic check registers.

Solving common debt and credit problems: In one article, the newsletter reminds readers that debt collectors have a duty to treat consumers fairly and without harassment. The publication also warns of scams by people falsely claiming to be debt collectors. In another article, consumers who normally turn to companies such as car title lenders, payday loan stores and pawnshops for small loans are advised to instead find out if banks are offering small loans at better interest rates and terms. Also in this issue of the newsletter are tips on how consumers can improve their credit reports and, in turn, pay less for loans.
Thinking about your options after a branch closing or bank merger: The newsletter describes important federal protections, such as advance notice of branch closings and a special grace period for FDIC insurance coverage after a bank merger. Other tips can help consumers meet their banking needs after a branch closing or merger.

Taking precautions before buying a bank CD from a broker: While using deposit brokers has grown in popularity because brokers often can negotiate higher interest rates, the CDs they sell may involve more risks than those purchased directly from an insured bank. For example, because the FDIC does not have the authority to approve deposit brokers and there are numerous examples of con artists running off with investors' money, consumers are advised to use a reputable deposit broker, preferably a professional they already know and trust. Also, consumers should be skeptical if the interest rate being advertised is significantly higher than general market rates, because that may be a sign that the broker is trying to lure in customers to sell them a non-insured product that's not in the depositor's best interest.

The goal of FDIC Consumer News is to deliver timely, reliable and innovative tips and information about financial matters, free of charge. The Spring 2013 edition can be read or printed at www.fdic.gov/consumers/consumer/news/cnspr13. To find current and past issues, visit www.fdic.gov/consumernews or request paper copies by contacting the FDIC's Public Information Center toll-free at 1-877-275-3342, by e-mail to publicinfo@fdic.gov, or by writing to the FDIC Public Information Center, 3501 North Fairfax Drive, Room E-1002, Arlington, VA 22226.

To receive an e-mail about each new issue of the quarterly FDIC Consumer News with links to stories, go to www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html.

The FDIC encourages financial institutions, government agencies, consumer organizations, educators, the media and anyone else to help make the tips and information in FDIC Consumer News widely available. The publication may be reprinted in whole or in part without permission. Please credit FDIC Consumer News. Organizations also may link to or mention the FDIC Web site.

# # #

Congress created the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in 1933 to restore public confidence in the nation's banking system. The FDIC insures deposits at the nation's 7,083 banks and savings associations, and it promotes the safety and soundness of these institutions by identifying, monitoring and addressing risks to which they are exposed. The FDIC receives no federal tax dollars — insured financial institutions fund its operations.

FDIC press releases and other information are available on the Internet at www.fdic.gov, by subscription electronically (go to www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html) and may also be obtained through the FDIC's Public Information Center (877-275-3342 or 703-562-2200).

2013/05 - IRS: Beware of e-Mail Scams about Electronic Federal Tax Payments

From alert:

Consumers should be aware of a scam e-mail about an electronic federal tax payment the e-mail claims they tried to make or which specifies the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS). The e-mail states that tax payments made by the e-mail recipient through EFTPS have been rejected.

The e-mail then directs recipients to a bogus link for a transaction report that, when clicked, downloads malicious software (malware) that infects the intended victim’s computer. The malware is designed to send back to the scammer personal and financial information already contained on the taxpayer's computer or obtained through capturing keystrokes. The scammer uses this personal and financial information to commit identity theft.

Please click here for more information regarding this scam.

2013/05 - IRS: We Do Not Initiate Contact by Email

From alert:

The IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email to request personal or financial information. This includes any type of electronic communication, such as text messages and social media channels.

This alert goes on to describe how to handle suspicious IRS-related email, phone calls and other communications.

2013/03 - E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC

http://www.fdic.gov/consumers/consumer/alerts/:

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

While the e-mails exhibit variations in the "From" and "Subject" lines, the messages are similar.

The fraudulent e-mails are addressed to the attention of the "Accounting Department" and meant to notify recipients that that that "ACH and WIRE transactions" are being blocked until "a special security software" is installed.

They then instruct recipients to go to a Web site for instructions on how to download the necessary files by clicking on a hyper-link provided (Note: the Web site addresses (URL) vary widely).

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.

2013/02 - National Credit Fraud Alert

Several banks in the area have had customers contact them regarding automated calls they have received from National Credit Association or National Credit Foundation, stating "your card has been deactivated or suspended, press 1 to reactivate". There are not any issues with our CFB debit cards. THESE ARE NOT LEGITIMATE CALLS – DO NOT GIVE OUT ANY INFORMATION. Please call 618-234-9500 for information or any questions.

Reviewed 2013 - Counterfeit Cashier's Check

The counterfeit cashier's check scheme targets individuals that use Internet classified advertisements to sell merchandise. Typically, an interested party located outside the United States contacts a seller. The seller is told that the buyer has an associate in the United States that owes him money. As such, he will have the associate send the seller a cashier's check for the amount owed to the buyer.

The amount of the cashier's check will be thousands of dollars more than the price of the merchandise and the seller is told the excess amount will be used to pay the shipping costs associated with getting the merchandise to his location. The seller is instructed to deposit the check, and as soon as it clears, to wire the excess funds back to the buyer or to another associate identified as a shipping agent. In most instances, the money is sent to locations in West Africa (Nigeria).

Because a cashier's check is used, a bank will typically release the funds immediately, or after a one or two day hold. Falsely believing the check has cleared, the seller wires the money as instructed.

In some cases, the buyer is able to convince the seller that some circumstance has arisen that necessitates the cancellation of the sale, and is successful in conning the victim into sending the remainder of the money. Shortly thereafter, the victim's bank notifies him that the check was fraudulent, and the bank is holding the victim responsible for the full amount of the check.

If you believe you may have fallen victim to this type of scam and wish to report it, please file a complaint with Internet Crime Complaint Center http://www.ic3.gov/complaint/default.aspx

Source: Internet Crime Complaint Center http://www.ic3.gov/crimeschemes.aspx#item-3

The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) was established as a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C) to serve as a means to receive Internet related criminal complaints and to further research, develop, and refer the criminal complaints to federal, state, local, or international law enforcement and/or regulatory agencies for any investigation they deem to be appropriate. The IC3 was intended, and continues to emphasize, serving the broader law enforcement community to include federal, as well as state, local, and international agencies, which are combating Internet crime and, in many cases, participating in Cyber Crime Task Forces.

2012/10 - NetTeller Phishing Alert!

We are receiving reports of phishing emails being sent from what appears to be a NetTeller email address customer _service@cm.netteller.com with the subject line of NetTeller Watch Notice. These are "Phishing emails" trying to get customers to click on the embedded NetTeller access link. These emails are not coming from NetTeller nor Community First Bank. Should you receive an email, DO NOT click on the link. It is recommended to permanently delete the email.